Distributed Systems: Concepts and Design

[desc]DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS

Fifth Edition

George Coulouris
Jean Dollimore
Tim Kindberg
Gordon Blair[/desc][img]71199-george-coulouris-distributed-systems-concepts-and-design-5th-edition.webp[/img][bookmark]{“51″: [2,”7.2 The operating system layer”,299],”125″: [2,”16.6 Timestamp ordering”,729],”14″: [1,”2 SYSTEM MODELS”,55],”71″: [2,”9.6 Coordination of web services”,429],”103″: [2,”13.6 Summary”,610],”136″: [1,”18 REPLICATION”,783],”24″: [2,”3.4 Internet protocols”,124],”159″: [2,”20.7 Summary”,931],”151″: [2,”19.8 Summary”,896],”153″: [2,”20.1 Introduction”,900],”35″: [1,”5 REMOTE INVOCATION”,203],”45″: [2,”6.3 Publish-subscribe systems”,260],”25″: [2,”3.5 Case studies: Ethernet, WiFi and Bluetooth”,146],”155″: [2,”20.3 Quality of service management”,905],”140″: [2,”18.4 Case studies of highly available services: The gossip architecture, Bayou and Coda”,800],”156″: [2,”20.4 Resource management”,915],”143″: [1,”19 MOBILE AND UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING”,835],”168″: [1,”REFERENCES”,985],”40″: [2,”5.5 Case study: Java RMI”,235],”36″: [2,”5.1 Introduction”,204],”145″: [2,”19.2 Association”,845],”167″: [2,”21.7 Summary”,982],”101″: [2,”13.4 Case study: The Global Name Service”,603],”80″: [2,”10.6 Application case studies: Squirrel, OceanStore, Ivy”,467],”87″: [2,”11.5 Cryptography pragmatics”,518],”106″: [2,”14.2 Clocks, events and process states”,615],”146″: [2,”19.3 Interoperation”,853],”10″: [2,”1.4 Focus on resource sharing”,32],”29″: [2,”4.2 The API for the Internet protocols”,165],”78″: [2,”10.4 Routing overlays”,451],”42″: [1,”6 INDIRECT COMMUNICATION”,247],”60″: [2,”8.2 Distributed objects”,355],”41″: [2,”5.6 Summary”,243],”33″: [2,”4.6 Case study: MPI”,196],”118″: [2,”15.6 Summary”,689],”6″: [1,”1 CHARACTERIZATION OF DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS”,19],”100″: [2,”13.3 Directory services”,602],”0″: [1,”Cover”,1],”98″: [2,”13.1 Introduction”,584],”104″: [1,”14 TIME AND GLOBAL STATES”,613],”123″: [2,”16.4 Locks”,710],”13″: [2,”1.7 Summary”,51],”54″: [2,”7.5 Communication and invocation”,321],”141″: [2,”18.5 Transactions with replicated data”,820],”84″: [2,”11.2 Overview of security techniques”,490],”20″: [1,”3 NETWORKING AND INTERNETWORKING”,99],”16″: [2,”2.2 Physical models”,57],”68″: [2,”9.3 Service descriptions and IDL for web services”,418],”73″: [2,”9.8 Summary”,437],”152″: [1,”20 DISTRIBUTED MULTIMEDIA SYSTEMS”,899],”9″: [2,”1.3 Trends in distributed systems”,26],”27″: [1,”4 INTERPROCESS COMMUNICATION”,163],”75″: [2,”10.1 Introduction”,442],”119″: [1,”16 TRANSACTIONS AND CONCURRENCY CONTROL”,693],”32″: [2,”4.5 Network virtualization: Overlay networks”,192],”76″: [2,”10.2 Napster and its legacy”,446],”130″: [2,”17.2 Flat and nested distributed transactions”,746],”165″: [2,”21.5 Data storage and coordination services”,953],”48″: [2,”6.6 Summary”,292],”44″: [2,”6.2 Group communication”,250],”93″: [2,”12.3 Case study: Sun Network File System”,554],”94″: [2,”12.4 Case study: The Andrew File System”,566],”149″: [2,”19.6 Adaptation”,884],”28″: [2,”4.1 Introduction”,164],”154″: [2,”20.2 Characteristics of multimedia data”,904],”96″: [2,”12.6 Summary”,581],”120″: [2,”16.1 Introduction”,694],”142″: [2,”18.6 Summary”,832],”4″: [1,”PREFACE”,13],”77″: [2,”10.3 Peer-to-peer middleware”,448],”67″: [2,”9.2 Web services”,402],”56″: [2,”7.7 Virtualization at the operating system level”,336],”15″: [2,”2.1 Introduction”,56],”5″: [1,”Acknowledgements”,16],”137″: [2,”18.1 Introduction”,784],”129″: [2,”17.1 Introduction”,746],”49″: [1,”7 OPERATING SYSTEM SUPPORT”,297],”150″: [2,”19.7 Case study: Cooltown”,889],”138″: [2,”18.2 System model and the role of group communication”,786],”47″: [2,”6.5 Shared memory approaches”,280],”107″: [2,”14.3 Synchronizing physical clocks”,617],”66″: [2,”9.1 Introduction”,400],”92″: [2,”12.2 File service architecture”,548],”26″: [2,”3.6 Summary”,159],”79″: [2,”10.5 Overlay case studies: Pastry, Tapestry”,454],”55″: [2,”7.6 Operating system architecture”,332],”90″: [1,”12 DISTRIBUTED FILE SYSTEMS”,539],”38″: [2,”5.3 Remote procedure call”,213],”12″: [2,”1.6 Case study: The World Wide Web”,44],”50″: [2,”7.1 Introduction”,298],”157″: [2,”20.5 Stream adaptation”,917],”82″: [1,”11 SECURITY”,481],”46″: [2,”6.4 Message queues”,272],”59″: [2,”8.1 Introduction”,354],”23″: [2,”3.3 Network principles”,107],”121″: [2,”16.2 Transactions”,697],”164″: [2,”21.4 Underlying communication paradigms”,946],”126″: [2,”16.7 Comparison of methods for concurrency control”,736],”97″: [1,”13 NAME SERVICES”,583],”110″: [2,”14.6 Distributed debugging”,637],”89″: [2,”11.7 Summary”,536],”17″: [2,”2.3 Architectural models”,58],”22″: [2,”3.2 Types of network”,104],”37″: [2,”5.2 Request-reply protocols”,205],”163″: [2,”21.3 Overall architecture and design philosophy”,940],”58″: [1,”8 DISTRIBUTED OBJECTS AND COMPONENTS”,353],”64″: [2,”8.6 Summary”,396],”139″: [2,”18.3 Fault-tolerant services”,793],”111″: [2,”14.7 Summary”,644],”102″: [2,”13.5 Case study: The X.500 Directory Service”,606],”114″: [2,”15.2 Distributed mutual exclusion”,651],”21″: [2,”3.1 Introduction”,100],”147″: [2,”19.4 Sensing and context awareness”,862],”65″: [1,”9 WEB SERVICES”,399],”109″: [2,”14.5 Global states”,628],”86″: [2,”11.4 Digital signatures”,511],”52″: [2,”7.3 Protection”,302],”128″: [1,”17 DISTRIBUTED TRANSACTIONS”,745],”34″: [2,”4.7 Summary”,199],”19″: [2,”2.5 Summary”,94],”166″: [2,”21.6 Distributed computation services”,974],”95″: [2,”12.5 Enhancements and further developments”,575],”53″: [2,”7.4 Processes and threads”,304],”99″: [2,”13.2 Name services and the Domain Name System”,587],”105″: [2,”14.1 Introduction”,614],”113″: [2,”15.1 Introduction”,648],”127″: [2,”16.8 Summary”,738],”39″: [2,”5.4 Remote method invocation”,222],”85″: [2,”11.3 Cryptographic algorithms”,502],”7″: [2,”1.1 Introduction”,20],”74″: [1,”10 PEER-TO-PEER SYSTEMS”,441],”3″: [1,”CONTENTS”,7],”69″: [2,”9.4 A directory service for use with web services”,422],”132″: [2,”17.4 Concurrency control in distributed transactions”,758],”135″: [2,”17.7 Summary”,779],”72″: [2,”9.7 Applications of web services”,431],”43″: [2,”6.1 Introduction”,248],”144″: [2,”19.1 Introduction”,836],”31″: [2,”4.4 Multicast communication”,187],”134″: [2,”17.6 Transaction recovery”,769],”148″: [2,”19.5 Security and privacy”,875],”70″: [2,”9.5 XML security”,424],”122″: [2,”16.3 Nested transactions”,708],”116″: [2,”15.4 Coordination and agreement in group communication”,664],”81″: [2,”10.7 Summary”,476],”169″: [1,”INDEX”,1043],”88″: [2,”11.6 Case studies: Needham–Schroeder, Kerberos, TLS, 802.11 WiFi”,521],”161″: [2,”21.1 Introduction”,934],”131″: [2,”17.3 Atomic commit protocols”,749],”1″: [1,”Title Page”,5],”62″: [2,”8.4 From objects to components”,376],”18″: [2,”2.4 Fundamental models”,79],”61″: [2,”8.3 Case study: CORBA”,358],”11″: [2,”1.5 Challenges”,34],”8″: [2,”1.2 Examples of distributed systems”,21],”2″: [1,”Copyright Page”,6],”133″: [2,”17.5 Distributed deadlocks”,761],”160″: [1,”21 DESIGNING DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS: GOOGLE CASE STUDY”,933],”158″: [2,”20.6 Case studies: Tiger, BitTorrent and End System Multicast”,919],”63″: [2,”8.5 Case studies: Enterprise JavaBeans and Fractal”,382],”162″: [2,”21.2 Introducing the case study: Google”,935],”83″: [2,”11.1 Introduction”,482],”57″: [2,”7.8 Summary”,349],”30″: [2,”4.3 External data representation and marshalling”,176],”112″: [1,”15 COORDINATION AND AGREEMENT”,647],”91″: [2,”12.1 Introduction”,540],”108″: [2,”14.4 Logical time and logical clocks”,625],”117″: [2,”15.5 Consensus and related problems”,677],”115″: [2,”15.3 Elections”,659],”124″: [2,”16.5 Optimistic concurrency control”,725]
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